Rome to Munich

I started by going to the train station and sending a parcel.  Do not use the postal system in Italy.  It is ridiculously expensive.  €2 per postcard?!

From there I set out for lunch (It took that long in the post office).

Salami mozzarella and pork meatball and cheese

Yes it cost €5 but it was SO GOOD.  Neither had tomato paste.  The better one was the pork meatball.  It had a layer of cheese sauce with a hint of tomato under the main layer of cheese.  Best thing I have ever eaten.

From there I wandered about finding some remaining sites.

The Pantheon

Inside

This was full of tourists, of course.  From there I went past many overpriced resturants and down many cobbled streets.

This is why gelato seems better than icecream - did you ever see icecream like this?

I went to Trevi fountain.  On the way I passed

The column of Marcus Aurelius, and ripped off by Trajan

Trevi Fountain.

The crowd here was huge, but the fountain did actually look quite nice.  It was surrounded by souvenir stalls.  They still go on about Roman Holiday and An American in Romehere, and you can buy prints and posters from the films.  Sylvester Stallone is also quite popular in the souvenir crap stakes.  I bought a teatowel – the first one I have seen for sale so far, I think.  From there I moved south to

The Capital

The ruins here were quite good, and not full of people, and free to look at.  I walked through the Jewish ghetto nearby, but didn’t find it that interesting.  On the way back I came across

a temple site inhabited by cats

From there it was back to the train station.  I had a night train to Munich but it wasn’t up on the information displays, so I found a cluster of Deutsche Bahn stewards and hung around near them.  The train eventually arrived 30min later.  I had a 6 seat cabin.  At first I was only sharing it with 2 Italian men, one of whom was 700 years old and immediately took his shirt off.  It wasn’t even that hot.  Fortunately one of the Italian stewardesses came by soon after and told him (I think) that he was grossing out the universe and he should put it back on.  He did, and then removed his shoes.  Blech.

The night trip wasn’t too bad – better than Nanjing to Jinan, anyway.  I arrived in Munich at 6.30.  It was raining, cold, and apparently Germany closes on Sundays.  I had to wait until 10 for the information office to open.  In the mean time I bought some milk.  They have very good milk here – unlike the Italians, who are apparently too fancy to drink flavoured milk, the Germans have more flavours than I have ever seen, and in decently sized containers.  I had a white chocolate macadamia.

When the information office opened he told me to go to some place set up for the Oktoberfest.  I went there, and it turned out you paid by the tent – €58 for 4 people.  Lacking 3 others, I went away again (after picking up a free inflatable pillow and 2 free packets of mints).

From there I headed to the largest campsite in Munich (650 sites).  They did have room – even with several bus groups who had hundreds of identical tents set up in large blocks.  I was given no. 3389, indicating somewhat more that 650 sites.  It was €25 to rent a tent per night, or €12.30 if I used my own.  I deployed the poncho.  It wasn’t quite complete, but after 5 min of walking around the campsite I collected a groundsheet, pegs, and some guylines – all from piles of rubbish.  In the daylight it didn’t look so bad.  I went out to the city centre to buy a tarp and a jumper, but everything was shut!  Since I was walking around in a disposible raincoat (transparent), no warm clothes, and sandals, I needed something to say to everyone that gave me a strange look:
“Keine Jumper, keine Schuhe, keine Ahnung” – no jumper, no shoes, no clue.

I went back to the campsite and the poncho was still up.  But during the night I had to roll out and put it up about every 5min as drunks tripped on the guy lines.  Not a good night.

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